Monday, October 24, 2011

"Just Govern" (and maybe shut up)

Last month, I had some cable issues, so the cable man came out and tinkered with the wires. He left the wall plate unscrewed and dangling, and since then, Matty periodically mentions the "Bad TV Man." Who else but a Bad TV Man would leave a wall plate in such a state?

This morning, I was watching the Times' video of Mayor Tony Mack addressing the effort to recall him, and Matthew came over to check it out. "Mommy!" he exclaimed, "it's The Bad TV Man!"

Good eye, kid! Mack does look JUST like The Bad TV Man. The Bad TV Man, but More Tired. It got me thinking that the perhaps Mack should check out the job opportunities with the cable companies when his ass is recalled. I'm sure he'll leave all the wall plates dangling, but at least we're talking wall plates, and not people's lives.

Mack also accused those of us involved in the recall effort of sour grapes: you know, we all wanted jobs or contracts and didn't get what we wanted, so we're trying to give him the boot. I cannot say enough: I never wanted a job with the city. And, even if I did, it doesn't change the fact that Tony Mack is a small and petty man without vision or love of the people, and he needs to go before he destroys the city.

As his criticism of the recallers spiraled into the incoherent and bizarre, he accused the group of remaining silent during the years Joseph Santiago presided over the police department, particularly 2005, when, in the middle of a gang war, the murder rate in Trenton was horrific. At least I think that's the year Mack is referring to; I'm not sure, because he didn't say. First, that's just a flat out stupid argument. And, plenty of people in this city WERE up in arms, but at that time, there was SO much disinformation coming from the police department. We all recall Santiago's bullshit* mantra: "Crime is down." Mack's blather on the Times' video sounded eerily similar to Santiago's lies. Crime is down, Tony? Let's just look at the last couple of weeks. Tell that to Jordan Rivera's family. Or Quadir Keys's family. Or Arman Pangad's family. Tell that to the man police say justifiably killed a man who was attacking his wife; tell that to the dead man's family and friends. Tell that to the people who live around the Calhoun Street Bridge, where there was a firefight last weekend. Tell that to Lamont Tiller; his home was invaded IN BROAD DAYLIGHT, and he and his lady friend were duct taped and held at gunpoint. Tell that to the couple hit with birdshot on Coolidge Avenue last weekend. Tell that to Butch Osterman, the sheriff's officer stabbed in Kingsbury Towers last week. Tell that to the family and friends of man bludgeoned and stabbed to death near Cooper Field. Tell it to the pizza delivery drivers robbed in September. Tell that to the firefighters who — after putting out a tough blaze on Genessee St., and had to treat five of their own for injuries — had their firetruck vandalized earlier this month. Tell that to those whose violent stories didn't make it to the papers, or the details weren't revealed to the public. Tell it to the rest of us who have to live amid the real and constant threat of violence. You can say it all you want, Tony, but crime is not down. Your words mock the fear and grief of the residents of this city, and those lies insult the scores of police officers recently laid off after putting their lives on the line for the citizens in Trenton.

He also added that he should be left to "just govern." Tony, if you had been governing, we wouldn't be here right now.

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* I started this blog in 2007 and immediately and publicly criticized the administration for the rise in violent crime (and be assured that several of my co-recallers did the same). It wasn't the most violent year, nor was the next. But we had 2 murders within feet of our house in 2008. Our garage and Glen's car were shot in the fall of 2010, after Tony was elected, and it could not have been handled any worse by the powers-that-be. But, hey, Crime is Down! The chant of fools.